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Home | Flying gliders in England and Canada! | ALL AT SEA! | ABOUT PILOT MOUND | MORE PIONEER FARMING | HOLLAND LIBERATION 2005 | HOLLAND 2005 | HOLLAND HOSTS | THE PURCHASE CLAN | More of the Clan | Prairie Farming | PRAIRIE PIONEERS | MORE "FRIENDLY FIRE" | "FRIENDLY FIRE" | WAR HEROES | A War Hero | Historic Photos! | FAMILY FLYERS | HIGH FLYERS | A Giant Killer ! | Parrett photos | RADIO ROMANCE | Flying Blimps ! | Riflegirl | A boy soldier. | MORE ARMY | WINNING WARS ! | RADIO RESCUE | Parrett family | THE PARRETT NAME | About Me | Family Photo Album | Favorite Links | royparrett@hotmail.com
ABOUT PILOT MOUND

This is the mound which gives the town its name
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Site of Indian sacred meetings, and pitched battles

Pilot Mound is a prarie town in Manitoba, nearly a hundred miles west of Winnipeg. It takes its name from a a 116-foot landmark, a hill which was pushed up by natural gas, the summit used by Indians to look out for enemies, and also used as a burial site at times.There were also fierce battles fought on the slopes in the mid- 1980s. The town is almost in the shadow of the Mound.

There are many stories about the Mound, some fanciful- an "astronomical observatory" and so on. But, it was heaved up by underground gas, apparently, according to geologists. Many have drilled at the Mound, hoping to find oil deposits, in vain so far.









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Mother complained that father "stole" the straps from her steamer trunk to mend the horses' harness! (The trunks were never used again anyway!)

My English parents knew very little about farming. And mother came from a sheltered life in Moreton, Dorset. She had to learn to wash with hard water, bake bread, keep chickens, turkeys and goats, and travel three miles to the nearest neighbor, and to town for supplies. Dad had to deal with livestock, and mended the harness with straps from mother's steamer trunks, much to her disgust. Sister Mamie arrived next, in June 1915, but after five years of crops being ruined by early frosts, hailstorms and plagues of grasshoppers they moved to the city- Winnipeg- and dad joined the army as World War One was raging. He was slated for overseas, so mother wangled a permit and headed for England, with young Mamie, and Roy in arms. But, father's draft was cancelled and he didn't proceed, so mother visited her family there, returning to Winnipeg in 1919.

George Parrett in Army Service Corps 1917
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Concentrated at Valcartier for overseas

Dad was concentrated at Valcatier, Quebec, on draft for overseas. Although the government had decreed "no more dependents to proceed overseas", my mother got a premit from her MP, and headed "home" with me, a babe in arms, and sister Mamie a toddler of two- four days on the train and 17 on the ship,in hostile waters! But, faher's draft didn't proceed, so mother visited her family, in England, until returning on a dependents ship in 1919.

Here is the photo from mother's World War One passport with her, Mamie and Roy.



Mother Mabel, baby Roy and sister Mamie
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This photo from mother's passport of 1918

Other military happenings listed here:

More pioneer farming!

More interesting notes- CLICK

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